Tag Archives: WWII

The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak

 

via Random House

Sometimes a book, let’s say a seemingly innocent young adult novel, comes along and sucks you in. It enchants you with real, faulted characters and beautiful descriptions. It chews you up, peppering the story with loss and grief, and soothes your wounds with stories of friendship, acceptance and love. Ultimately it spits you out, tears sliding down your cheeks, and you realize that the standard to which you hold literary fiction has been irrevocably raised.

The Book Thief’s back cover sets it up as the story of a young girl who steals books in Nazi Germany. The danger comes when her foster parents decide to hide a Jew in their basement. The simplicity of the blurb is deceptive, and you realize this right off the bat when the story is introduced and told by none other than Death himself.

 

As is only appropriate when the narrator is Death, the style of storytelling is a bit unorthodox. Surprises in the plot are leaked before they actually happen, but I was surprised to find that those leaks, while shocking, just drove me on in my reading, rather than spoiling the story. Things within the text are described in a way that is wholly unfamiliar. Zusak had a tendency to turn words into objects; “Her voice was like suicide, landing with a clunk at Liesel’s feet…” Death gave life to things as ordinary as the sky; “The last time I saw her was red. The sky was like soup, boiling and stirring. In some places, it was burned. There were black crumbs, and pepper, streaked across the redness.”

All of these things added to the beauty and complexity of the story, and I haven’t even told you about the plot yet. The story of Liesel Meminger begins on a train. Death has just taken her younger brother en route to their new foster parents. In the first 30 pages of the book, Liesel loses her mother and brother, is thrust into the arms of a strange new family (the Hubermanns), and steals her first book, though she can’t yet read.

As the story progresses, tentative bonds are formed and strengthened, friends are found, and Liesel begins to grow more confident in her new life. The story is full of darkness but its redemption lies in the strength of its characters. Liesel and her friend Rudy could have been kids in my neighborhood growing up. They resonate a believable familiarity that keeps the book relatable in the  midst of incredible events.

A Jew, Max Vandenburg, shows up at Liesel’s house in the middle of the night. The reason, we learn, has everything to do with Hans Hubermann’s stint in WWI, his friendship with a Jewish soldier, and a promise made to that soldier’s widow upon Hans’ return to Germany. Max is the son of that Jewish soldier, and he is now in need of the help promised to his mother so many years ago, and so the Hubermans take him in, hide him in the basement, and Liesel’s education begins in ernest.

Liesel learns more important lessons in the basement of her foster parents’ house than she does at school. It is where she learns to write, it is where she begins to identify with a Jew while his brethren are being marched through town on their way to Dachau, and it is where words ultimately save her life.

Bottom line: In spite of The Book Thief‘s technical categorization of Young Adult, I would recommend it to anybody who is looking for a book full of beauty and struggle. I will warn you: I read the end of the book through a blur of tears, but it was definitely worth it.

Listen to Markus Zusak talking about the book here:


Sarah’s Key, by Tatiana de Rosnay

Sarah's KeySarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Sarah’s Key was an enjoyable, albeit slightly depressing read.

The story begins in Paris, July 1942, from the perspective of a little girl. The girl, whose name isn’t actually acknowledged until much later in the book (I’m not sure I understand why) and her family are being rounded up by the French police with other Jewish families for eventual deportation to Auschwitz.

Fast forward sixty years and we meet the main narrator of the book, Julia Jarmond, an American ex-pat living in Paris with her French husband and daughter. Julia is a journalist covering the 60th anniversary of the roundup and, as the back of the book says, “stumbles onto a trail of secrets that link her to Sarah…”

The two stories are well-woven into easy, digestible sections, each story doing its job to pull you further in to the separate story lines until they collide in a way I wouldn’t have predicted.

The story, besides being some well-written historical fiction, draws in a lot of themes, some I could identify with better than others. For example, Julia deals with a lot of things that, being single and childless, aren’t things I worry about. An unstable marriage, pregnancy problems and uneasy relations with the in-laws are issues that my married friends and family members can probably better sympathize with and I’m guessing feel closer to the narrator because of it.

In a nutshell: I enjoyed reading the book. It was informative about events in the past that I was unfamiliar with, and I liked that it was written by a French author and much of the story centered around contemporary France’s attitude about the events of the past. There were a lot of unhappy events in the story, so while it was a good story and interesting to read, it was a bit of a downer. The end, which I won’t give away, does end on a hopeful note though.

And: This book (St. Martin’s Press, 2007) includes a brief interview with the author about the book, recommended further reading titles and a list of discussion questions. The book raises a lot of good discussion points and I would definitely recommend it for a book club/reading group.